Health Ministry/Parish Nurse

Thoughts from your Parish Nurse

Have you been thinking of adding more physical activity to your life? Have you thought about walking? Walking is a great way to be more active and is the most popular physical activity among adults. Walking can also be an excellent family activity! Most people can walk, including many people with disabilities who are able to walk on their own or with walkers or other aids. What are the benefits of walking? Two benefits of walking are that it’s easy to do and has a low risk of injury. Walking also is free or low-cost because you don’t need special equipment, clothing, facilities, or training. Because walking can easily fit your schedule, needs, and abilities, it’s a good way to start getting active if you’ve been inactive. Like other kinds of regular physical activity, walking at a brisk pace also may offer health benefits, such as
 
• lowering your risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes
• strengthening your bones and muscles
• helping you burn more calories
• improving your fitness
• lifting your mood
 
Spirituality, just like exercise heals and strengthens us. Marrying the two, walking and discussion of scripture, is a win-win!
 
Blessings and health,
Launa

 

Emergency Contact Sheets

Please help us help you and yours. Having an emergency contact entered into our system allows the church to get in touch with someone you trust in case of emergency, be they local or out of town. Forma can be found in the Narthex. (I have sneaked them onto the Serve counter.)

Team members 

We are excited to introduce the Health Ministry Team Members! Dian Ward, RN, Paula Anderson, Tim Friday, Laura Martin, Tim Martin, and Beverly Norton. 
 

Confidentiality

All communications and conversations between the Parish Nurse and members will be treated in a confidential manner consistent with standards of nursing and pastoral care. No information will be divulged to staff, family, or other health care professionals without the consent of the parishioner.
 

What is Parish Nursing?

Parish Nursing has been defined by the American Nurses Association as “a unique, specialized practice of professional nursing which focuses on the promotion of health within the context of the values, beliefs and practices of a faith community…its mission and ministry to its members…and the community it serves.”
 

What are examples of Parish Nursing?

Health Counseling

A member of the congregation is diagnosed with diabetes. She has a number of questions about this condition and especially her new diet. The Parish Nurse could meet with her to review in more detail things that her physician told her about diabetes. The Parish Nurse may believe that a consultation with a dietitian or nutritionist would be valuable to this person, and may arrange a referral through the family doctor.
Pregnant, nursing, or new mothers may have questions or need support. The Parish Nurse is available for them. A youth or teen of the church, or their parents, may have questions regarding sexuality, drugs, alcohol abuse, depression, suicide prevention and more. The Parish Nurse is available to discuss these issues in a private, professional and strictly confidential manner. Referrals may be offered, as necessary.
Men’s and Women’s health issues are discussed privately and confidentially. Advocacy, support, referrals and spiritual support are all offered by the Parish Nurse.
 
Individual meetings may be scheduled with the Parish Nurse to assist a parishioner with sorting through the grieving process, stress, depression, other mental health or addiction issues, understanding their medications, etc. Once the issue is addressed, appropriate referrals may then be made as needed.
 

Blood Pressure Screenings

Blood Pressure Screenings are offered periodically to the congregation by the Health Ministry team and volunteer nurses. Health Education Several members may have voiced questions about a specific health issue. The Parish Nurse might organize a small discussion/support group in response.
 

Health Education

Several members may have voiced questions about a specific health issue. The Parish Nurse might organize a small discussion/support
group in response.
 
Various classes and programs addressing health issues may be offered to MVPC members and the community. An article is written for the monthly Messenger Newsletter.
 

Liaison with Other Church Volunteer Groups

The Parish Nurse works closely with the Pastor, Deacons and staff of the church. Being aware of the many volunteer groups within MVPC available to the congregation, the Parish Nurse can facilitate referrals to the appropriate group leaders within the church to address the parishioner’s needs.
 

Liaison with community programs and health professionals

The Parish Nurse serves as a resource person and an advocate for parishioners and their families.
 

Hospital Visitation Team

The Parish Nurse and Visitation Team, consisting of Tim Friday, Willette Friday, LaValle Vita, Lois Shivers-Wynn, Paul Tomlinson and Michele Weber, make visits to parishioners in the hospital, hospice, rehabilitation or extended care facilities and/or home. Phone visits are also utilized. Hospital visits are also made by Pastor David Dendy, Family Ministries Director Chris Kirschman, and possibly church deacons.
 

What is NOT a function of the Parish Nurse?

The Parish Nurse does not provide services that require a doctor’s order, such as changing dressings, giving medications or intravenous fluids. She does not duplicate existing services such as home health or hospice care. The Parish Nurse Program does not maintain a clinic in the church.